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The European Union: In Or Out?

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AB Editor | 14:24 Mon 25th Apr 2016 | News
249 Answers
 

This poll is closed.

If the EU referendum happened tomorrow, which way would you vote?

  • Out - 208 votes
  • 70%
  • In - 91 votes
  • 30%

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Stats until: 03:14 Thu 18th Apr 2024 (Refreshed every 5 minutes)
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That is the point really Geezer. Typical union failing, couldn't spot a business opportunity if it was under their noses. The farmers that mikey loves are all in a union. Surely they would not be anti union when it comes to who they are prepared to employ. Black market mikey.
Anybody who honestly thinks that we have a choice is deluded, the big boys are just serving corporate interest as usual and although we are made to believe that it is our choice, don't be so immature. the future of the EU has already been decided whether we want to believe it or not.
The union's ability to act has been curtailed for many a year now. And still the right want more restrictions so the employers have no need to worry about the consequences of decisions they make.

I don't think one can blame a union for not getting involved in businesses they have no existing presence in. It's not like folk can be brought out in sympathy or whatever these days.

I don't know the extent of the farmers union but I suspect the farm workers would be less keen on labour movement threatening their jobs, whereas farm owners are likely to be happier remaining in the EU, since presumably that gives a good chance of continuing handouts; whereas being out would mean trusting that one's own government would provide the same or better level of subsidies etc.. It's typical 'looking after one's own interests' in preference to supporting what s best for one's country and fellow/future citizens.
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/663946/EU-plans-United-States-Europe

hardly a surprise....just like the stormtoopers, they just keep marching on..
mikey444

/// On the estate where I live, there many people who have never worked, all of them white anglo-saxon. ///

Why are you always ready to criticise white anglo-saxons, yet always ready to defend those who are not?

I wonder how many of those are among your work shy?

AOG...I am merely stating the truth. Its a lovely morning here and already these fit young men are sitting one each others doorsteps, smoking and drinking from cans of lager, while I have been up, getting ready to go to work.
mikey4444

And you know them all well enough to know that they are all white anglo-saxons?
AOG...don't be daft...have you mixed up your meds again ?

If they walk like ducks, they are ducks....

They are still there, drinking and smoking merrily away, and they are without any doubt white anglo-saxons.
^Celts
I would vote Out if it looked like In was going to win strongly, and In otherwise. I want In to win with a very close result, ideally 50.1%. Therefore, on the AB poll, I have voted In.
Or Eastern Europeans perhaps.
Ellipsis, // I would vote Out if it looked like In was going to win strongly, and In otherwise. //

That makes no sense. Why?
Hi Naomi

I like the idea of staying in a reformed Europe. The reforms that Cameron negotiated prior to this vote were inadequate and don't really address the problems that we have with the EU. With a really tight In vote, the Outers would be justified to call for another vote within a few years - maybe even three years, i.e. within the life of this parliament. Those few years could be used for the EU to properly begin to reform (or not). Should it not reform, then it's likely the next vote would be for Out, and I'd reluctantly agree with that.
//Should it not reform, then it's likely the next vote would be for Out, and I'd reluctantly agree with that.//

Next vote?? You really are in denial. If the vote goes for remain there will never be an opportunity to get out again. This is the only chance we will get by peaceful means.
Togo, if that's the case then so be it - we'll remain. But I do think that if the vote is really tight, e.g. 50.1% for remain, then there will be a strong appetite for another vote within a few years, because basically it would show that half the country was unhappy and wanted to leave for some reason, and that really should not be ignored.
In another few years we'll do what we're ordered to do. Or the EU Army will give us what for.
Staying in a reformed Europe is less of an issue; it's a reformed EU I'm not holding my breath for. Even if it agreed to return to being an EEC I'd not trust it to not be pulling the wool over everyone's eyes.
Ellipsis, you’re playing with fire. On the eve of a referendum, with us, allegedly, having the much lauded ‘clout’ the ‘Inners’ are confident we possess, Europe, one would have thought, would be conducive to compromise. However, the government failed to achieve much at all in the way of reform, so how likely is it to achieve more after an ‘In’ vote? I’d say its chances are nil. We are one voice among twenty-seven – soon to be more - and this is our one opportunity to reclaim our country. We won’t be offered another – and if we don’t take it Europe will continue, whether we like it or not, to do as it pleases, dragging us along in its wake – and there will be nothing we can do about it.
Svejk

Mikey only assumes they are all white Anglo-Saxon, because they are not dark skinned.
> Ellipsis, you’re playing with fire

Agreed. I have to, because I don't want either "In" or "Out", I want "In Something Better".

> On the eve of a referendum, with us, allegedly, having the much lauded ‘clout’ the ‘Inners’ are confident we possess, Europe, one would have thought, would be conducive to compromise. However, the government failed to achieve much at all in the way of reform

Yes, I agree. That was a disappointment.

> so how likely is it to achieve more after an ‘In’ vote? I’d say its chances are nil.

You have to assume, given how little was offered, that Europe was feeling comfortable that we'd vote to remain. A really tight vote, with an appetite for another vote soon, would hopefully prompt a better set of concessions. If not, we need to go.

> this is our one opportunity to reclaim our country. We won’t be offered another

I think if there was a really tight vote then we would be offered another. The In side has a lot in its favour, so if the vote was really close then the Out side would be justified in asking for another vote really soon. And given that many of the Outs are Tories, and they're the party in power for the next four years, I think Cameron would find it difficult to resist the calls from his party for another vote, and would therefore have a really strong negotiating hand to take back to Europe.

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